Mismatch in young people entering the workplace for the first time
Paul Rogers

BLOG AUTHOR

Paul Rogers

Product Director

Paul joined MOL in April 2015 and leads on product development across all qualifications. He is a chartered Psychologist and learning technology expert. Before joining MOL, he worked as a consultant Business Psychologist, and as a lecturer at the Universities of Bolton and Manchester, where his research and PhD applied social psychology to online learning.

Mismatch in young people entering the workplace for the first time

This time of year sees hundreds of thousands of young people making decisions about their careers and education options. Both the CIPD (Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development) and the AAT (Association of Accounting Technicians) have highlighted issues and misconceptions about education and training in their industries.

When assessing the link between employment and education, the AAT (Association of Accounting Technicians) identified a gap in skills for new entrants to the workplace and employer expectations. Employers identified the skillset as the most important factor when selecting a candidate, with 88% claiming to look at a candidate’s skillset over their education when considering them for a role.

On a similar note, the CIPD published a report, Over-qualification and skills mismatch in the graduate labour market. The report highlights how the UK has the highest graduation rate in Europe, and as a result is commonly seeing over-qualified graduates in roles where a degree was previously not required. According to the CIPD, 58.8% of graduates now occupy traditionally non-graduate roles. In Germany this figure is only 10%.

Both organisations point to a trend for vocational or hands-on training losing popularity in favour of university-based academic study, which may not be the best route to success for every career path.

What does this mean for young people? Peter Cheese, director of the CIPD points to a need for clear options: “Efforts need to be redoubled to ensure young people who are making choices after receiving their GCSE and A level results can access good quality careers information, advice and guidance so they can make better informed decisions. “  

Mark Farrar, chief executive of the AAT commented: “An even stronger correlation between mainstream education and the job market must be created to lessen the barriers that young people can face when it comes to entering the labour market.”

MOL are proud to offer courses that meet the ever increasing demands of employers and equip our learners with the skills and qualifications they require to fulfil their career aspirations.