Paul Jager

BLOG AUTHOR

Paul Jager

MOL Product Manager - Property & Conveyancing

Paul became an estate agent in 1985 after finishing his degree and later owned a successful estate agents in London for 14 years. Having sold his business in 2002, Paul joined MOL in 2004 as a tutor for MOL’s property programmes. Soon after, Paul was promoted to Head of the Property Division with responsibility for property training and the writing and development of materials and workbooks for the ‘National Federation of Property Professionals’ qualifications, which is today known as PropertyMark.

Sweating the Small Stuff

It’s funny how the smallest things can stick in the mind. This is especially true in business. Unfortunately, it’s not only the good things that are remembered. In fact sometimes the good things aren’t remembered at all. But, you can guarantee that something bad will not go unnoticed. Worse, it will probably be shared among friends and family!

Why is this important to property agents?

Because so much that we do relies on the smallest of detail - the way we conduct conversations, present our properties, and appear in public are just a few examples.

I recently heard the story of a property agent who won instruction on a property they knew would sell quickly and for a good commission. They immediately printed off a set of business terms and conditions and sent it to the owner for approval.

However, in their haste they forgot the small stuff. They didn’t check what was being sent. The alterations to their business conditions they had agreed with the owner, to secure the instruction, hadn’t been made to their standard terms which were sent.

Not a big issue?

The property owner received the document. Although he could have queried the mistakes, he didn’t. Instead he came to a quick conclusion. If the agent couldn’t produce a simple, accurate document at the start of the business relationship what hope was there later on in the transaction when real help might be needed?

Another property agent was instructed instead.

Was this a reasonable action?